English information

The English version of our website is still under construction. In the meantime please find the most important information on our museums and your visit in a short overview on this page.

 

Museums

Luther House

Begun in 1504, the Luther House was originally built as an Augustinian monastery. It was the centre of Luther’s activity for more than thirty-five years. He lived here as a monk upon his arrival in Wittenberg in September 1508, and he continued to live here with his family after 1525. His theological breakthrough took place here, he lectured to students from throughout Europe here, and it was here that he created the texts that would change the world. The Luther House has been open to visitors as a museum since 1883; today, it is the world’s largest museum for the history of the Reformation.

Please note: Due to construction work the Luther House will be closed from 29th August 2016 until 3rd March 2017.

Lutherhaus Wittenberg
Collegienstraße 54
06886 Lutherstadt Wittenberg

T. +49 (0) 34 91 - 4 20 31 18
lutherhaus@martinluther.de
 

Luther's Birthplace

Martin Luther was born in Eisleben on November 10, 1483. Eisleben's residents began to commemorate their city’s most famous son at a very early date; by the end of the seventeenth century, they had already provided Luther pilgrims with a public museum in the house where Luther was born. This makes the museum one of the oldest institutions of its kind in a German-speaking country. The house's present appearance derives from renovation work carried out after the city fire of 1689. The building was completely modernised and also expanded from 2005 to 2007. The resulting ensemble has since received five architectural awards in the course of becoming one of Saxony-Anhalt’s most distinguished buildings.

Martin Luthers Geburtshaus
Lutherstraße 15
06295 Lutherstadt Eisleben

T. +49 (0) 34 75 - 714 78 14
geburtshaus@martinluther.de
 

Luther's Parents' Home

Luther's home was Mansfelder Land: It was in Eisleben that the reformer drew his first breath. A few months after his birth, his family – still bearing the name "Luder" – moved to Mansfeld.

Martin Luther spent his childhood and adolescence in Mansfeld, and he lived here a total of 13 years, from 1484 to 1497. It was in the Mansfeld school that he received the education that offered him an entry to the academic world. He established lifelong friendships here, and it was also here that he discovered his love of music. Throughout his life, Martin Luther considered himself to be a child of the County of Mansfeld.

With its exhibition "I am a child of Mansfeld", Luther's Mansfeld home has a museum depicting the everyday life of the master miner's family, Luther's time at school and the family's close ties to the town, the church and the County of Mansfeld.

Luthers Elternhaus
Lutherstraße 26/29
06343 Mansfeld-Lutherstadt

T. +49 (0) 347 82 - 919 38 10
elternhaus@martinluther.de

Luther's Death House

Throughout his life, Martin Luther maintained close contact to the Mansfeld district. He visited Eisleben, the town where he was born, on numerous occasions to exert his influence over events. Luther was paying another visit to the town to mediate among the quarrelling local rulers when he died there on February 18, 1546.

Today, the museum located opposite the Eisleben market commemorates Luther’s death. The house was first named Luther’s Death House in 1726. In 1863, the Prussian treasury acquired the building and established a memorial on the site.

Between 2010 and early 2013, the memorial was carefully restored and expanded into a museum complex with the addition of a modern new building. As a result, all rooms in the Death House are now accessible as a unified and largely barrier-free tour.

Luthers Sterbehaus
Andreaskirchplatz 7
06295 Lutherstadt Eisleben

T. +49 (0) 34 75 – 714 78 40
sterbehaus@martinluther.de
 

Melanchthon House

The Melanchthon House in Wittenberg is an architectural jewel. The Renaissance building, with its characteristic gable, has long been considered among the most beautiful in the city.

Originally commissioned by John Frederick I, Elector of Saxony, the three-storyed house was given to Philipp Melanchthon – known as the “Teacher of Germany” – to encourage him to remain at the local university. The new house offered space for his family and the opportunity to take on students as paying guests. The building was purchased by the Prussian state in 1845. In 1898 and 1899, they provided the first storey with a reconstruction of the scholar’s study, which is also the room where Melanchthon died.

From late 2010 to early 2013, the memorial was restored and expanded with addition of a modern new building. The annex now contains some of the amenities formerly in the memorial, including the ticket counter, a museum shop, and technical and sanitation facilities, thus freeing additional space for exhibition. For the first time, visitors have largely barrier-free access to the entirety of the Melanchthon House memorial.

Melanchthonhaus
Collegienstraße 60
06886 Lutherstadt Wittenberg

T. +49 (0) 34 91 – 420 31 10
melanchthonhaus@martinluther.de
 

Special Exhibitions

Martin Luther. His Life in Pictures

28 August 2016 – 29 January 2017
Augusteum Wittenberg

Collegienstraße 60
06886 Lutherstadt Wittenberg

T. +49 (0) 34 91 - 4 20 31 18
lutherhaus@martinluther.de

Frock, T-Shirt and Academic Gown
200th anniversary of the Protestant Seminary in Wittenberg

2 October 2016 – 29 January 2017
Augusteum Wittenberg

Collegienstraße 60
06886 Lutherstadt Wittenberg

T. +49 (0) 34 91 - 4 20 31 18
lutherhaus@martinluther.de

 

Your Visit

Opening Hours

1 November to 31 March
10 a.m. – 5 p.m.
Tue – Sun (closed Mondays)

1 April to 31 October
10 a.m. – 6 p.m. (Luther House and Special Exhibitions 9 a.m. – 6 p.m.)
daily

English version coming soon!

Information & Booking

Visitor service
T. +49 (0) 34 91 – 4 20 31 71
wittenberg@3xhammer.de

 

Admission 

  regular reduced
Single ticket 8 € 6 €
Group ticket per person
10 or more people
6 €  
Family ticket 14 €  
Comination ticket Wittenberg

valid at the Luther House and the Melanchthon House on two days in a row

10 €  
  regular reduced
Single ticket 4 € 2,50 €
Group ticket per person
10 People or more
3 €  
Family ticket 10 €  
Combination ticket Eisleben
valid in Luther's Birthplace and Luther's Death House on two days in a row
6 €  
Combination ticket Mansfelder Land
valid in Luther's Birthplace, Luther's Death House ans Luther's Parents' Home on two days in a row
8 €  
  regular reduced
Singel ticket 4 € 2,50 €
Group ticket per person
10 People or more
3 €  
Family ticket 10 €  
Combination ticket Mansfelder Land
valid in Luther's Birthplace, Luther's Death House ans Luther's Parents' Home on two days in a row
8 €  
  regular reduced
Singel ticket 4 € 2,50 €*
Group ticket per person
10 People or more
3 €  
Family ticket 10 €  
Combination ticket Eisleben
valid in Luther's Birthplace and Luther's Death House on two days in a row
6 €  
Combination ticket Mansfelder Land
valid in Luther's Birthplace, Luther's Death House ans Luther's Parents' Home on two days in a row
8 €  
  regular reduced
Singel ticket 4 € 2,50 €
Group ticket per person
10 People or more
3 €  
Family ticket 10 €  
Combination ticket Wittenberg
valid in the Luther House and the Melanchthon House on two days in a row
10 €  
  regular reduced
Single ticket Luther or Seminary 4 € 3 €
Group ticket per person
10 People or more
2 €  
Combination ticket Luther and Seminary 6 € 4 €
Group combination ticket per person
10 people or more
3 €  

 

 

Guided tours

Tours in English can be booked in all our museums and special exhibitions and need to be booked in advance.

Please contact our Visitor service:

T. +49 (0) 34 91 – 4 20 31 71
wittenberg@3xhammer.de

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